For Students

Related Programs: Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 3 / Contemporary Native North American Art from the Northeast and Southeast

Hemlock Ironworkers 2008

Carla Hemlock, Tribute to the Mohawk Ironworkers, 2008, Cotton cloth, glass beads, sequins, cotton/ nylon threads, Photo by Greg Horn, Courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC

Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 3

On view at UMMA May 24–September 14, 2014

Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 3 explores the work of contemporary artists of Native North American origin working in both traditional and new media, acknowledging their long and diverse cultural legacies while overtly and simultaneously exploring, and often confronting, the many ongoing issues inherent to their cultural heritage.

This exhibition is the culmination of a decade-long investigation and exploration into fine art created by Indigenous artists from North America, defined by their regional origins. This concluding exhibition of the three-part series presents new work by Native American, First Nations, Métis, and Inuit artists and designers from the Northeastern and Southeastern regions of the United States and Canada. Curated by Ellen Taubman, this Changing Hands presentation is the third in a series of exhibitions organized by the Museum of Arts and Design in New York.

 

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES INSPIRED BY THE WORK OF CONTEMPORARY NATIVE AMERICAN ARTISTS

In Conversation: Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 3

Sunday, June 1, 3–4 pm
A. Alfred Taubman I Gallery

This program is free and open to the public, but space is limited. Please register to secure your place by emailing umma-program-registration@umich.edu 

 

The art in this major traveling exhibition celebrates the rich and diverse contributions of contemporary Native and First Nations artists to the global art scene. Join Curator for Museum Teaching and Learning, Pamela Reister, for an exploration of this compelling exhibition. The artists in Changing Hands interpret and redefine such traditional media as basketry, beadwork, textiles, wood, metalwork and stone, as well as look to contemporary media such as video, photography, and performance and installation art. The variety of media is matched by the span of themes that include the natural and spiritual worlds as sources of inspiration; the reinterpretation of traditions; and the often politically charged issue of cultural assimilation.

In Conversation: Historical Practices and Contemporary Native American Art

Sunday, July 27, 3–4 pm
A. Alfred Taubman Gallery I

This program is free and open to the public, but space is limited. Please register to secure your place by emailing umma-program-registration@umich.edu.

Many of today’s Native artists draw on historical tribal practices for their contemporary art making. In this Conversation, U-M PhD candidate Kristine Ronan will highlight the intersection between the historical and the contemporary in an array of objects from the touring exhibition Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 3. Comparing objects from the exhibition to some of UMMA’s permanent collections, we will especially consider how relating the past to the present might serve as political commentary for a number of today’s Native artists.

 

2014 Doris Sloan Memorial Program / UMMA Dialogue: Speaking of Past and Present: Changing Perceptions and Practices in Contemporary Native Art

Thursday, September 4, 6:30–9:30pm
UMMA Apse and A. Alfred Taubman I Gallery
Refreshments will be offered and the gallery will be open after the conversation.

Join exhibition curator Ellen Taubman, U-M Associate Dean and Carroll Smith Rosenberg Collegiate Professor of History, American Culture, and Native American Studies Philip J. Deloria, and a panel of artists including mother-daughter pair of award-winning contemporary black ash basket weavers Kelly Church (UM class of 1998) and Cherish Parrish (current UM LSA student), Canadian-based new media artist Skawennati, and Michigan ceramics and mixed media artist Jason Wesaw. This dynamic gathering will explore the themes of the exhibition including the spirit of experimentation among Native artists working in a range of media and the diverse ways in which artists are both acknowledging and celebrating their cultural heritage while overtly confronting many of the issues at the forefront of indigenous art and politics today.

 Established through the generosity of Dr. Herbert Sloan, the annual Doris Sloan Memorial Program honors one of the Museum’s most ardent friends and supporters, Doris Sloan, a long-time UMMA docent.

Exhibition Tours

The art in this major traveling exhibition celebrates the richness and diversity of contemporary Native and First Nations art. The artists in Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 3 interpret and redefine such traditional media as basketry, beadwork, textiles, wood, metalwork and stone, as well as look to contemporary media such as video, photography, and performance and installation art. Join UMMA docents for an exploration of this compelling exhibition. All tours are free and open to the public. No pre-registration is required.

Sunday, June 15, 2pm 

Sunday, July 20, 2pm

​Sunday, August 10, 2pm

​Sunday, August 24, 2pm

 

FOR FAMILIES

Storytime at the Museum

Saturday, May 31, 11:15 am

Children ages four to seven are invited to hear a story in the galleries. This month, we will read a story related to the Native American art in Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 3. The story will be followed by a short art activity responding to the art on display. Parents must accompany children. Siblings are welcome to join the group. Meet in front of the UMMA Store.

Family Art Studio

Saturday, June 21, 11 am–1 pm and 2–4 pm
​Multipurpose Room
Free. Pre-registration required by calling 734-926-4128 or online: 

CLICK HERE to register for 11 am–1 pm class

CLICK HERE to register for 2–4 pm class

Create your own art project inspired by the exhibition of contemporary Native American artists in Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 3. Designed for families with children ages 6-12 to experience art together, UMMA docents will lead families on an exploration of the exhibition followed by a hands-on workshop. This workshop is offered in partnership with the Ann Arbor Art Center. 

A SPECIAL SCREENING

Selections from A Future Past

Friday, July 18, 5–6:30pm and 6:30–8pm, during UMMA Fridays After 5
Sunday, August 10, 3:15–4:45pm (to follow docent-lead tour from 2–3pm)
Sunday, September 14, 3:15–4:45pm (to follow docent-lead tour from 2–3pm)

Helmut Stern Auditorium

UMMA will screen a series of short films and videos curated for Changing Hands 3 by Wanda Nanibush in consultation with exhibition curator Ellen Taubman (total 23 minutes):

1) Robert's Paintings (2011, Canada, 52 min) by Shelley Niro is about the life and career of Robert Houle; Courtesy of V-Tape, Toronto; 2) The Gift (2011, Canada, 2 min) by Terril Caulder; 3) Because of Who I Am (2010, United States, 4 min) by Marcella A. Ernest; 4) PowWowWow (2011, Canada, 3:38 min) by Lisa Jackson; 5) Algonquin (2011, Canada, 4:39) by Travis Schilling; 6) Make Your Escape (2010, Canada, 7:30 min) by Ehren Bearwitness Thomas

Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 3 / Contemporary Native North American Art from the Northeast and Southeast was organized by the Museum of Arts and Design, New York, and made possible by the National Endowment for the Arts. The exhibition catalogue is made possible in part with the support of the Smithsonian Institution’s Indigenous Contemporary Arts Program. Lead support for UMMA’s installation is provided by the University of Michigan Health System, the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs, and the University of Michigan Office of the Provost. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Senior Vice Provost for Academic Affairs, Native American Studies Program, the Eisenberg Institute for Historical Studies, and the Doris Sloan Memorial Fund.
Second image from top: Peter B. Jones, Portrait Jar–New Indian, 2010, mixed media, Photo by Warren Wheeler, courtesy of the Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Colgate University, Hamilton, New York Third image from top: Jason Wesaw, The Doorway, 2010, Clay, indigo Bunting feathers, photo courtesy of the artist Fourth image from top: David L. Pruitt, Hands of the Real People–The Pasy Present and Future, 2011, Clay, slip painted, Photo by Cora Lathrop