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Programs and Tours

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Special thanks to the Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan for its support of communications and marketing strategies to promote collaborative programming at UMMA in 2009-2010.



LS&A Museum Theme Year

The Wednesday Night Museums Lecture Series continues at UMMA featuring museum professionals from across the country and as wide ranging as Anthony Shelton, Director of the University of British Columbia’s Museum of Anthropology, to UM’s own Bruce Conforth, first curator of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, to a round table discussion on the History of UM as told through its Museums. All programs are held at 7:30 pm in the Helmut Stern Auditorium. As part of the Museum Theme Year, UM Department of Screen Arts and Culture’s Projectorhead film series held at UMMA focuses on museums. Films will be screened every Thursday evening at 7 pm in the Helmut Stern Auditorium.

Please see the Museum Theme Year website at www.lsa.umich.edu/museumstheme for details about these events and the many other engaging activities lined up for the winter term.


February 2
[Music and Dance] [UMS at UMMA]-->

UMS at UMMA

Masterpieces Revealed Series

In this series local artists and UM faculty provide a step-by-step exploration of some of the artistic works presented during the UMS season through live performance and discussion, deconstructing the nuances of performance and explaining what turns a piece into a “masterpiece.”

Music of The Bad Plus
Tuesday, February 2, 7–8:30 pm
Commons

UM Jazz Professor and saxophonist/composer Andrew Bishop will lead a program surrounding the eclectic and unforgettable music of the group The Bad Plus. With collaborators in tow, Bishop will use performance and discussion to help deconstruct why exactly their music is so distinctive and genre defying. This event is presented in conjunction with The Bad Plus’s main stage concert at the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre on February 4.


February 4

Zell Visiting Writers Series

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Department of English Program in Creative Writing Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell (’64). For more information, please see www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/mfaeve.asp.

Adam Haslett
Thursday, February 4, 5:15 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Adam Haslett’s short story collection, You Are Not a Stranger Here, was a New York Times bestseller and a finalist for both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. It has been translated into 15 languages. He lives in New York.



UM Department of Screen Arts and Culture’s Projectorhead film series

As part of the Museum Theme Year, UM Department of Screen Arts and Culture’s Projectorhead film series held at UMMA focuses on museums. Films will be screened every Thursday evening at 7 pm in the Helmut Stern Auditorium.

Please see the Museum Theme Year website at www.lsa.umich.edu/museumstheme for details about these events and the many other engaging activities lined up for the winter term.

For more information, please contact Mary Lou Chlipala at (734)763-4087

Secret Museums (Peter Woditsch, 2009, 77 min.)
February 4, 7 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Throughout the ages, erotic art has been created by some of the world's best-known artists, but it is rarely on public display. Whether it is held in private collections, or kept under lock and key in museums and libraries worldwide, erotic art and literature remains censored. But when graphic, even extreme sexual imagery is freely available on the Internet, why is erotic art considered so dangerous that it must be prohibited?

Filmed in England, France, Germany, Italy, Sweden and the U.S., Secret Museums explores the locked rooms, warehouses, museum cellars, bank safes and private homes where erotica is hidden, from the British Museum and the National Library of France to Munich's National Graphics Collection and the Vatican, home of the world's largest collection of pornography. Gaining access to carefully guarded collections with names such as "Secretum," "Gabinetto Segreto" and "L'Enfer," the film reveals books and images never before filmed or photographed.

Secret Museums features interviews with wealthy collectors, museum curators and guides, librarians, authors, gallery directors, art restorers and experts in erotic art, who discuss the reasons for the cultural suppression and control of erotic art; how institutional gatekeepers, as the protectors of public morality, decide what is acceptable; the difficulty of some in accepting sexuality as an appropriate subject for art; the compulsion to assemble private collections; and how many erotic masterpieces remain hidden today.


February 5

An Economy of Means: The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection programs

Film Screening
Herb and Dorothy
Friday, February 5, 9:30 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Herb and Dorothy tells the extraordinary story of Herbert and Dorothy Vogel, who managed to build an extremely important contemporary art collections with very modest means. They collected artworks guided by two rules: the piece had to be affordable, and it had to be small enough to fit in their one-bedroom Manhattan apartment. Most of those they supported and befriended in this process went on to become world-renowned artists including Sol LeWitt, Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Richard Tuttle, and Chuck Close.


February 6

History of Art Symposium

Contemporary Strategies in Documentary Photography

This two-part symposium (Part I is January 30) explores new practices in documentary photography through the work of some of its most important contemporary practitioners. The talk will be followed by a panel discussion.

Part II: Allan Sekula and Sally Stein
Saturday, February 6, 1–5:30 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Since the 1970s, Allan Sekula has been on the forefront of documentary practice in his dual role as both photographer and theoretician. Sally Stein is an art historian whose field is the history of photography with particular interest in American photography of the New Deal era. Feminist issues and methodology inform her writing. This symposium will address issues of importance to socially and politically engaged photographers.



Guided Tours

Tradition Transformed
Saturday, February 6, 2 pm



UMS at UMMA

Sô Percussion
Saturday, February 6, 7:30 pm and 10 pm
Apse

In our ongoing partnership with UMS, UMMA is delighted to be the venue for the presentation of this exciting Brooklyn-based quartet. Since coming together at the Yale School of Music in 1999, Sô Percussion has been creating music that is at turns raucous and touching, barbarous and heartfelt. Called “astonishing and entrancing” by Billboard Magazine, “brilliant” by the New York Times, Sô Percussion’s innovative work with today’s most exciting composers and their own original music has quickly helped them forge a unique and diverse career.

The early show features an all-Steve Reich program, including Mallet Quartet, written specifically for Sô Percussion. A unique second set—the “promenade concert”—begins in the Apse and then leads audiences in a procession through the Museum.

Both concerts are general admission; tickets are $40. UMS will offer some student tickets at a reduced price as part of the winter half-price student ticket sale. Visit the UMS website (www.ums.org) or contact the ticket office at 734.764.2538.


February 7

Guided Tours

The New UMMA
Sunday, February 7, 1 pm

Tradition Transformed
Sunday, February 7, 2 pm



An Economy of Means: The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection programs

Film Screening
Herb and Dorothy
Sunday, February 7, 3 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Herb and Dorothy tells the extraordinary story of Herbert and Dorothy Vogel, who managed to build an extremely important contemporary art collections with very modest means. They collected artworks guided by two rules: the piece had to be affordable, and it had to be small enough to fit in their one-bedroom Manhattan apartment. Most of those they supported and befriended in this process went on to become world-renowned artists including Sol LeWitt, Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Richard Tuttle, and Chuck Close.



Film Screenings

Dekalog po Dekalogu / The Decalogue... After the Decalogue
Sunday, February 7, 6 pm
Parts VII–X (2008, 118 min)
Helmut Stern Auditorium

The Decalogue... After the Decalogue is a cycle of documentaries (in Polish with English subtitles) based on Beata Januchta’s concept of an elevator trip through reality. This project is an explicit reference to Krzysztof Kieslowski’s The Decalogue, which premiered 20 years ago and inspired the series. A new generation of directors developed these films about ordinary people—at times disoriented, overwhelmed, and in search of their identity. Each part is an original interpretation of one of the Ten Commandments posing a question, a statement, or a puzzle. Presented in partnership with the Copernicus Endowment and the Center for Russian and East European Studies.


February 9

Tuesday Night Lecture Series

Translating Knowledge; Global Perspectives on Museums and Community

Translating Knowledge considers strategies for engaging the peoples whose lives and histories are presented in the museum in the complicated processes of interpreting culture. This yearlong lecture series organized by the UM Museum Studies Program brings 10 scholars to the University of Michigan from around the world. These scholars’ work offers new paradigms for confronting the social and political challenges of representation in the museum. Each participant will present a lecture that examines the theory and a workshop that explores the practice of their community-engaged scholarship.

Sheila Watson
University of Leicester
Lecture: Tuesday, February 9, 7 pm, Helmut Stern Auditorium
Workshop: Wednesday, February 10, 4 pm, Multipurpose Room


February 10

Tuesday Night Lecture Series (workshop)

Sheila Watson
University of Leicester
Lecture: Tuesday, February 9, 7 pm, Helmut Stern Auditorium
Workshop: Wednesday, February 10, 4 pm, Multipurpose Room


February 11

Zell Visiting Writers Series

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Department of English Program in Creative Writing Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell (’64). For more information, please see https://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/webster.asp.

John Burnside
Thursday, February 11, 5:15 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

John Burnside has published eleven collections of poetry, including Feast Days (1992), winner of the Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize, The Asylum Dance (2000), winner of the Whitbread Poetry Award and The Good Neighbour, (2005). His most recent collections are Gift Songs (2007) and The Hunt in the Forest (2009). He is also the author of a collection of short stories, Burning Elvis (2000), and seven novels, including The Dumb House (1997), Living Nowhere (2003), The Devil’s Footprints (2007) and Glister (2008). His memoir, A Lie About My Father, was published in 2006 and was awarded the Saltire Book of the Year and the Scottish Arts Council Non-Fiction Book of the Year awards. He lives in Fife, Scotland, with his wife and sons. He is a Professor of English at the University of St Andrews, where he teaches American poetry, literature and ecology, and creative writing.



UM Department of Screen Arts and Culture’s Projectorhead film series

As part of the Museum Theme Year, UM Department of Screen Arts and Culture’s Projectorhead film series held at UMMA focuses on museums. Films will be screened every Thursday evening at 7 pm in the Helmut Stern Auditorium.

Please see the Museum Theme Year website at www.lsa.umich.edu/museumstheme for details about these events and the many other engaging activities lined up for the winter term.

For more information, please contact Mary Lou Chlipala at (734)763-4087

The Hermitage Dwellers (Aliona van der Horst, 2003, 73 min.)
February 11, 7pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

The Hermitage Dwellers is as much about the people who work in Russia's renowned museum as it is about the glorious art works housed in this St. Petersburg institution. We meet with several "Hermitage-niks"—including Olga Bogdanova, the head of museum maintenance, icon curator Alexandra Kostsova, museum attendant Valentina Barbashova, and art handler Vadim Kuptsov, among others—each of whom explains their own very personal reasons for considering the palace of Catherine the Great their "home."

For Russians the Hermitage is regarded as a place of pilgrimage. For these workers, however, the Hermitage has also been a safe haven from the tumultuous events of Russian history and the hardships of contemporary Russian life. Indeed, each of them explains how their personal traumas and difficulties have been transformed by having developed an intimate relationship with a favorite piece of art. For them, surrounded everyday by remarkable beauty, the Hermitage has become a place of emotional healing.

"A Must-See! Offers a fond (and often moving) glimpse behind the scenes at Russia's fabled Hermitage Museum."—Entertainment Weekly

"As the documentary progresses, we begin to get the sensation that this is truly a drama about people and the passage of time, and not so much about art. Yet it is about the museum, as much as this reflects the emotional and spiritual condition of the people to whom we are introduced. Highly original in scope, The Hermitage Dwellers takes us on a journey of a country that has been victimized by dictatorship and buoyed by the spirit of its people."—Bridges: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Theology, Philosophy, History, and Science


February 12
UM Student Programs

Mark Webster Reading Series
February 12, 7 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

One poet and one fiction writer from the MFA program, each introduced by a peer, will read a selection of their work. The Mark Webster Reading Series presents emerging writers in an intimate and inviting setting. We encourage you to bring your friends. For more information: https://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/webster.asp



The Ark at UMMA Student Songwriter Series
Friday, February 12, 8–10pm
Commons

The Ark invites student songwriters at the University of Michigan to submit their original music demo in order to compete for a live performance showcase at UMMA and a chance to perform at The Ark. After a successful launch in fall 2009, the series continues with two performance showcases (February 12 and March 12) featuring the best of the student songwriters selected by the Ark staff from the contest submissions, and a final performance and announcement of the winner of the series (March 26), who will be invited to perform at The Ark.

Demo submissions for the February 12 showcase are due by January 26; submissions for the March 12 showcase are due February 25. Submissions should be sent to The Ark, ATTN: Emily Ross, 316 S. Main St., Ann Arbor, MI, 48104 or Emily@theark.org. Students must be currently attending UM. Only solo or duo acoustic acts apply; no bands will be considered.



An Economy of Means: The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection programs

Film Screening
Herb and Dorothy
Friday, February 12, 9:30 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Herb and Dorothy tells the extraordinary story of Herbert and Dorothy Vogel, who managed to build an extremely important contemporary art collections with very modest means. They collected artworks guided by two rules: the piece had to be affordable, and it had to be small enough to fit in their one-bedroom Manhattan apartment. Most of those they supported and befriended in this process went on to become world-renowned artists including Sol LeWitt, Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Richard Tuttle, and Chuck Close.


February 13

Guided Tours

An Economy of Means
Saturday, February 13, 2 pm


February 14

Guided Tours

The New UMMA
Sunday, February 14, 1 pm

The Eye of the Beholder
Sunday, February 14, 2 pm



An Economy of Means: The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection programs

Film Screening
Herb and Dorothy
Sunday, February 14, 3 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Herb and Dorothy tells the extraordinary story of Herbert and Dorothy Vogel, who managed to build an extremely important contemporary art collections with very modest means. They collected artworks guided by two rules: the piece had to be affordable, and it had to be small enough to fit in their one-bedroom Manhattan apartment. Most of those they supported and befriended in this process went on to become world-renowned artists including Sol LeWitt, Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Richard Tuttle, and Chuck Close.



The Eye of the Beholder: European Drawings and Prints from the Pulgram-McSparran Collection programs

Concert
Everybody Loves Alma
Sunday, February 14, 8 pm
Apse

Alma Schindler Mahler Werfel was the center of a creative social network that bridged disciplines, religions, and national boundaries. Many of the most important creative men of her generation loved her, including two in the exhibition—Gustav Klimt and Oskar Kokoschka. This program features composers who enjoyed her friendship or love. Gustav Mahler’s Rückertlieder, Alban Berg’s renowned Op. 1 piano sonata, and chamber music by Alexander Zemlinsky will be performed by UM School of Music, Theatre & Dance faculty and guests.


February 16

An Economy of Means: The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection programs

Concert
Contemporary Directions
Ensemble
Tuesday, February 16, 8 pm
A. Alfred Taubman Gallery II

UM’s contemporary music ensemble, under the direction of new conductor and UM alum Christopher James Lees, presents a program of pioneering minimalists Philip Glass, Steve Reich, and others. The program culminates in Frederic Rzewski’s Coming Together, a dramatic setting of a letter written by Sam Melville, who was held in Attica prison during the 1971 prison riot.


February 17

Jazz Series

Admission is $5 at the door
Wednesday, February 17, 9 pm
Commons

Come hear jazz every month at UMMA! Experience outstanding local artists in an intimate group setting. This month: the Andrew Bishop Quartet, featuring Andrew Bishop, reeds; Matt Endhal, rhoads; Andrew Kratzat, bass; and Mike Gould, drums.


February 18

Zell Visiting Writers Series

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Department of English Program in Creative Writing Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell (’64). For more information, please see www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/mfaeve.asp.

Ron Carlson
Thursday, February 18, 5:15 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Ron Carlson is the award-winning author of four story collections and four novels, most recently The Signal and Five Skies. His fiction has appeared in Harper’s, the New Yorker, Playboy, and GQ, and has been featured on NPR’s This American Life and Selected Shorts as well as in Best American Short Stories and The O. Henry Prize Stories. His novella, Beanball, was recently selected for Best American Mystery Stories. He is the director of the UC Irvine writing program and lives in Huntington Beach, California.



UM Department of Screen Arts and Culture’s Projectorhead film series

As part of the Museum Theme Year, UM Department of Screen Arts and Culture’s Projectorhead film series held at UMMA focuses on museums. Films will be screened every Thursday evening at 7 pm in the Helmut Stern Auditorium.

Please see the Museum Theme Year website at www.lsa.umich.edu/museumstheme for details about these events and the many other engaging activities lined up for the winter term.

For more information, please contact Mary Lou Chlipala at (734)763-4087

Russian Ark (Aleksandr Sokurov, 2002, 99 min.)
February 18, 7 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

“Russian master Alexander Sokurov has tapped into the very flow of history itself for this flabbergasting film. Thanks to the miracles of digital video, Sokurov (and cinematographer Tilman Buttner) uses a single, unbroken, 90-minute shot to wind his way through the Hermitage in St. Petersburg--the repository of Russian art and the former home to royalty. Gliding through time, we glimpse Catherine II, modern-day museumgoers, and the doomed family of Nicholas II. History collapses on itself, as the opulence of the past and the horrors of the 20th century collide, and each door that opens onto yet another breathtaking gallery is another century to be heard from. The movie climaxes with a grand ball and thousands of extras, prompting thoughts of just how crazy Sokurov had to be to try a technical challenge like this--and how far a distance we've traveled, both physically and spiritually, since the movie began.”

"One of the most astonishing films ever made" (Roger Ebert, Chicago           Sun-Times).



UM Student Programs

Third Thursdays
Thursday, February 18, 9 pm
Commons

UMMA is a regular site for UM students to show what they’ve got. This exciting performance series falls on the third Thursday evening of each month and features different student performers who work in a variety of media. The series is curated and produced by the UMMA Student Programming and Advisory Board. This week: Honey, featuring the vocals and keyboard/electronic sound/sampling skills of Wordy Thompkins, Jaren Strandlie on drum set/percussion, and the world premiere of Andy Haefner's electronic music-generating program.


February 19

UM Student Programs

Mark Webster Reading Series
February 19, 7 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

One poet and one fiction writer from the MFA program, each introduced by a peer, will read a selection of their work. The Mark Webster Reading Series presents emerging writers in an intimate and inviting setting. We encourage you to bring your friends. For more information: https://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/webster.asp



An Economy of Means: The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection programs

Film Screening
Herb and Dorothy
Friday, February 19, 9:30 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Herb and Dorothy tells the extraordinary story of Herbert and Dorothy Vogel, who managed to build an extremely important contemporary art collections with very modest means. They collected artworks guided by two rules: the piece had to be affordable, and it had to be small enough to fit in their one-bedroom Manhattan apartment. Most of those they supported and befriended in this process went on to become world-renowned artists including Sol LeWitt, Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Richard Tuttle, and Chuck Close.


February 20

Guided Tours

Tradition Transformed
Saturday, February 20, 2 pm



Dance on Camera Festival

Saturday and Sunday
February 20, 7 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

“The Dance on Camera Festival is one of those NY stealth events, prized by its devotees...where the allusiveness of dance meets the intimacy of film to create a new kind of magic”—John Rockwell, the New York Times. Coming to Ann Arbor directly from the 38th Dance On Camera Festival at Lincoln Center in New York, this screening celebrates the immediacy, energy, and mystery of dance as combined with the intimacy of film.


February 21

Guided Tours

The New UMMA
Sunday, February 21, 1 pm

Tradition Transformed
Sunday, February 21, 2 pm



Dance on Camera Festival

Saturday and Sunday
February 21, 7 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

“The Dance on Camera Festival is one of those NY stealth events, prized by its devotees...where the allusiveness of dance meets the intimacy of film to create a new kind of magic”—John Rockwell, the New York Times. Coming to Ann Arbor directly from the 38th Dance On Camera Festival at Lincoln Center in New York, this screening celebrates the immediacy, energy, and mystery of dance as combined with the intimacy of film.


February 23

An Economy of Means: The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection programs

Film Screening
Herb and Dorothy
*Tuesday, February 23, 9:30 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Herb and Dorothy tells the extraordinary story of Herbert and Dorothy Vogel, who managed to build an extremely important contemporary art collections with very modest means. They collected artworks guided by two rules: the piece had to be affordable, and it had to be small enough to fit in their one-bedroom Manhattan apartment. Most of those they supported and befriended in this process went on to become world-renowned artists including Sol LeWitt, Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Richard Tuttle, and Chuck Close.

*special weeknight screening presented by UMMA’s Student Programming and Advisory Board


February 24

The Wednesday Night Museums Lecture Series

The Wednesday Night Museums Lecture Series continues at UMMA featuring museum professionals from across the country and as wide ranging as Anthony Shelton, Director of the University of British Columbia’s Museum of Anthropology, to UM’s own Bruce Conforth, first curator of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, to a round table discussion on the History of UM as told through its Museums. All programs are held at 7:30 pm in the Helmut Stern Auditorium. As part of the Museum Theme Year, UM Department of Screen Arts and Culture’s Projectorhead film series held at UMMA focuses on museums. Films will be screened every Thursday evening at 7 pm in the Helmut Stern Auditorium.


A Hard Day's Night: Building the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum
Bruce Michael Conforth, Program in American Culture, University of Michigan
Wednesday, February 24

Abstract:
In this lecture, Dr. Bruce Conforth will discuss the highs and lows, the practical and political, the mundane and sublime aspects of creating a world-class museum from scratch. The object of controversy from conception through the present, Dr. Conforth's tenure at the Museum covered its rockiest days (pun intended): when funding was tenuous, acceptance by artists who are generally regarded as anti-establishment was often in doubt, and the cost of the project rose from $54 to $96 million. Despite these are other difficulties, the Museum was finished and Dr. Conforth survived to bring us the story of one of the most unique museum projects of the end of the 20th Century.

Brief Biography:
Bruce Conforth received his PhD in Ethnomusicology and Folklore from Indiana University, Bloomington and was the Director of the Indiana University Archives from 1986-1991. He holds the rank Certified Archivist as granted by the Society of American Archivists. As an undergraduate fine arts major Conforth apprenticed with noted American abstract expressionist Willem de Kooning. In 1991 he was appointed the first Director of Curatorial and Educational Affairs of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, a position he held from the days of planning and fundraising through the construction of the building. During that time he was responsible for exhibit planning and design, building the collections, working with the inductees and other artists, developing the Museum's educational programs, and serving as a public spokesperson for the project. In 2001 Bruce Conforth joined the UM Program in American Culture where he is now a Lecturer II.


February 26

An Economy of Means: The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection programs

Film Screening
Herb and Dorothy
Friday, February 26, 9:30 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Herb and Dorothy tells the extraordinary story of Herbert and Dorothy Vogel, who managed to build an extremely important contemporary art collections with very modest means. They collected artworks guided by two rules: the piece had to be affordable, and it had to be small enough to fit in their one-bedroom Manhattan apartment. Most of those they supported and befriended in this process went on to become world-renowned artists including Sol LeWitt, Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Richard Tuttle, and Chuck Close.


February 27

Ann Arbor Art Center Workshops

Advanced registration is required. Please register online at www.annarborartcenter.org

Family Workshop: Capers
Scavenger Hunt
(all ages)
Saturday, February 27, 1:30–3 pm
Fee for parent and child: $15 members and UM Students/$18 non-members

This fun family workshop begins by scouring the Museum with a list of clues to unearth the amazing animals and mythical creatures lurking in paintings and sculptures throughout the collections. Finish off the hunt by creating an animal mask or clay creature inspired by your favorite beast and sharing everyone’s exciting discoveries. All materials included.



Guided Tours

An Economy of Means
Saturday, February 27, 2 pm


February 28

Guided Tours

The New UMMA
Sunday, February 28, 1 pm

An Economy of Means
Sunday, February 28, 2 pm



An Economy of Means: The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection programs

Film Screening
Herb and Dorothy
Sunday, February 28, 3 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Herb and Dorothy tells the extraordinary story of Herbert and Dorothy Vogel, who managed to build an extremely important contemporary art collections with very modest means. They collected artworks guided by two rules: the piece had to be affordable, and it had to be small enough to fit in their one-bedroom Manhattan apartment. Most of those they supported and befriended in this process went on to become world-renowned artists including Sol LeWitt, Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Richard Tuttle, and Chuck Close.