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Special thanks to the Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan for its support of communications and marketing strategies to promote collaborative programming at UMMA in 2009-2010.


March 3

UMMA Exhibitions Programming

Tradition Transformed: Chang Ku-nien, Master Painter of the 20th Century
Teacher Workshop
Wednesday, March 3, 4–7:30 pm
Galleries and Multipurpose Room

Area teachers explore the traditions of Chinese landscape painting with Professor Martin Powers, take a private tour of Tradition Transformed: Chang Ku-nien, Master Painter of the 20th Century, and have the opportunity to practice brush painting in the manner of Chang Ku-nien with Myong Raymond, who was a student of the artist. A light meal will be served and a teacher packet will be distributed. Registration required. Email Pam Reister at preister@umich.edu or Jann Wesolek at jannwes@umich.edu for more information.


March 4

Ann Arbor Art Center Workshops

Advance registration is required. Please register online at annarborartcenter.org

Light Bright: DIY Design
Thursday, March 4, 6–8:30 pm
$23 members and UM students/$25 non-members $10 lab fee

Add a unique element to your home decor by selecting one of two DIY inspired lighting projects. Investigate the elements of design and use a little creative ingenuity to create a puzzle piece pendant light or a custom cylinder table lamp. The finished product from this fun workshop should satisfy both your outer hipster and your inner crafter.


March 5

UMMA Exhibitions Programming

Film
Herb and Dorothy
Friday, March 5, 9:30 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Herb and Dorothy tells the extraordinary story of Herbert Vogel, a postal clerk, and Dorothy Vogel, a librarian, who managed to build one of the most important contemporary art collections in history with very modest means. They collected artworks guided by two rules: the piece had to be affordable, and it had to be small enough to fit in their one-bedroom Manhattan apartment. Most of those they supported and befriended in this process went on to become world-renowned artists, including Sol LeWitt, Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Richard Tuttle, and Chuck Close. Directed by Megumi Sasaki.


March 6

Ann Arbor Art Center Workshops

Advance registration is required. Please register online at annarborartcenter.org

Family Workshop: Van Gogh’s Sunflowers (all ages)
Saturday, March 6, 1:30–3:30 pm
$18 members and UM students/$20 non-members

Happy Birthday to Vincent Van Gogh! Celebrate and explore the vibrant artwork of Van Gogh and learn to paint your own sunflower still life with a modern twist. All materials included.



UMMA Exhibitions Programming

Gallery Talk
The Eye of the Beholder: European Drawings and Prints from the Pulgram-McSparran Collection
Saturday March 6, 2 pm
Works on Paper Gallery

This exhibition of important prints and drawings from the late Ernst Pulgram and his wife Dr. Frances McSparran includes drawings and prints by artists such as George Grosz, Ernst Kirchner, and Oskar Kokoschka. Explore the social commentary, bold graphic imagery, and delectation of the female form that is embodied in the work of outstanding European artists from roughly 1920 to 1950 with UM doctoral student Kristine Ronan.


March 7

UMMA Exhibitions Programming

Family Workshop: Chinese Brush Painting and Other Family Activities
Sunday, March 7, 1–5 pm
Free, drop in

Explore the basic techniques of Chinese ink painting in this fun drop-in workshop. Discover the beauty and vitality of a single brushstroke and the spontaneity of working with these ancient materials. Family activities in the galleries will also be offered. All levels and ages welcome.

The exhibition Tradition Transformed: Chang Ku-nien, Master Painter of the 20th Century and related programs are made possible in part by the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, the University of Michigan Office of the Provost and UM Center for Chinese Studies, and the Blakemore Foundation.

Guided Tours

The New UMMA
Sunday, March 7, 1 pm

The Eye of the Beholder: European Drawings and Prints from the Pulgram-McSparran Collection
Sunday, March 7, 2 pm



UMMA Exhibitions Programming

Film
Herb and Dorothy
Sunday, March 7, 3 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Herb and Dorothy tells the extraordinary story of Herbert Vogel, a postal clerk, and Dorothy Vogel, a librarian, who managed to build one of the most important contemporary art collections in history with very modest means. They collected artworks guided by two rules: the piece had to be affordable, and it had to be small enough to fit in their one-bedroom Manhattan apartment. Most of those they supported and befriended in this process went on to become world-renowned artists, including Sol LeWitt, Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Richard Tuttle, and Chuck Close. Directed by Megumi Sasaki.


March 8

Music and Dance

Refractions
Monday, March 8, 8 pm
Apse

Geri Allen, UM School of Music, Theatre, and Dance jazz piano professor, presents her new work Refractions, the creative outgrowth of her 2008–09 Guggenheim Fellowship. Her performance is accompanied by an original short film by renowned artist Carrie Mae Weems. "Refractions: Flying Toward The Sound" will be released internationally with an enhanced CD by Motema Music to the general public March 9, and will be made available to the UMMA audience during Ms. Allen's performance on March 8 and will remain in the UMMA Museum Store thereafter.


March 9

Tuesday Night Lecture Series: Translating Knowledge; Global Perspectives on Museums and Community

Translating Knowledge considers strategies for engaging the peoples whose lives and histories are presented in the museum in the complicated processes of interpreting culture. This year-long lecture series organized by the UM Museum Studies Program brings 10 scholars to the University of Michigan from around the world and the US. These scholars’ work offers new paradigms for confronting the social and political challenges of representation in the museum. Each participant will present a lecture that examines the theory and a workshop that explores the practice of their community-engaged scholarship.

All Tuesday night lectures are in the UMMA Helmut Stern Auditorium at 7 pm and all Wednesday afternoon workshops are in the UMMA Multipurpose Room at 4pm.

Aaron Glass
American Museum of Natural History and Bard Graduate Center
Lecture: Tuesday, March 9, 7 pm, Helmut Stern Auditorium
Workshop: Wednesday, March 10, 4 pm, Multipurpose Room


March 10

Tuesday Night Lecture Series (workshop)

Aaron Glass
American Museum of Natural History and Bard Graduate Center
Lecture: Tuesday, March 9, 7 pm, Helmut Stern Auditorium
Workshop: Wednesday, March 10, 4 pm, Multipurpose Room



Museum Theme Year

Please join us for the conclusion of the Wednesday Night Museums lecture series.

Crucibles and Catalysts: The Potential of Museums and Galleries in Higher Education
Wednesday, March 10, 7:30 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Before what may be the end of a golden period of museum expansion in the West, the universities of British Columbia, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Oxford all completed major projects aimed at expanding or renovating their museums and improving access to collections. By focusing on the University of British Columbia’s Museum of Anthropology, its director, Anthony Shelton, will ponder the museum’s new role as a catalyst to bring about new alignments between different disciplines and faculties, especially as it relates to undergraduate teaching and research. He will provide an exploration of the ways in which the museum movement’s newly found penchant for challenging, critical, multidisciplinary, controversial, and sometimes even discomforting exhibitions and programs can contribute to revitalizing both educational and the wider public culture and provide vibrant and important linkages between universities and communities.


March 11

Zell Visiting Writers Series

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the UM Department of English Program in Creative Writing Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell (’64).

Darcie Dennigan and Tung-Hui Hu
Thursday, March 11, 5:15 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Darcie Dennigan's first book, Corinna A-Maying the Apocalypse, won the Poets Out Loud prize and was published by Fordham University Press in 2008. Her poems and other writing have appeared in 180 More: Extraordinary Poems for Every Day, Atlantic Monthly, The Believer, Gulf Coast, The Nation, POOL, and Tin House. She is an associate editor at H_NGM_N, an online journal of poetry, poetics, etc., and a graduate of the Michigan MFA program. The recipient of recent awards from Coldfront Magazine and the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, she lives in Providence, Rhode Island.

Tung-Hui Hu is the author of two books of poetry, Mine (Ausable/Copper Canyon, 2007), and The Book of Motion (University of Georgia, 2003). Described as a "contained surreal style that deftly shapes a philosophical argument" (Los Angeles Times), his writing has appeared in The New Republic, Ploughshares, Gastronomica, and Martha Stewart Living Radio. At the University of Michigan, he teaches courses on time-based art and poetry. His latest project is a sound installation titled The Last Time You Cried (lasttimeyoucried.com).


March 12

The Ark at UMMA Student Songwriter Series

Friday, March 12 and 26, 8–10pm
Commons

The Ark invites student songwriters at the University of Michigan to submit their original music demo in order to compete for a live performance showcase at UMMA and a chance to perform at The Ark. After a successful launch in fall 2009, the series continues with two performance showcases (February and March 12) featuring the best of the student songwriters selected by the Ark staff from the contest submissions, and a final performance and announcement of the winner of the series (March 26), who will be invited to perform at The Ark.



UMMA Exhibitions Programming

Film
Herb and Dorothy
Friday, March 12, 9:30 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Herb and Dorothy tells the extraordinary story of Herbert Vogel, a postal clerk, and Dorothy Vogel, a librarian, who managed to build one of the most important contemporary art collections in history with very modest means. They collected artworks guided by two rules: the piece had to be affordable, and it had to be small enough to fit in their one-bedroom Manhattan apartment. Most of those they supported and befriended in this process went on to become world-renowned artists, including Sol LeWitt, Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Richard Tuttle, and Chuck Close. Directed by Megumi Sasaki.


March 13

Ann Arbor Art Center Workshops

Advance registration is required. Please register online at annarborartcenter.org

Pastel Painting
Saturday, March 13, 1:30–4:30pm
$27 members and UM students / $30 non-members; $10 lab fee

Explore the basics of pastels. The workshop begins with a small tour of still-life paintings at the Museum. You will draw inspiration for your pieces from two very different works in the collection—Vanitas Still Life by Willem Hedas or Northern Summer Window by Marsden Hartley. All materials included.



Guided Tours

Tradition Transformed: Chang Ku-nien, Master Painter of the 20th Century
Saturday, March 13, 2 pm


March 14

Guided Tours

The New UMMA
Sunday, March 14, 1 pm

The Eye of the Beholder: European Drawings and Prints from the Pulgram-McSparran Collection
Sunday March 14, 2 pm



UMMA Exhibitions Programming

2010 Doris Sloan Memorial Lecture
Secrets to Chinese Painting: Technical Strategies for the Modern World
Lecture by Dr. Aida Yuen Wong
Sunday, March 14, 3 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Aida Yuen Wong, Associate Professor of Fine Arts and Chair of East Asian Studies at Brandeis University, will give the 2010 Doris Sloan Memorial Lecture in conjunction with the exhibition, Tradition Transformed: Chang Ku-nien, Master Painter of the 20th Century. Dr. Wong will focus on the challenges of the era as artists encountered Western-style modernity and sought to reform Chinese art traditions. The teaching of sumiao (pencil sketching) and xiesheng (drawing from life), skills strongly aligned with scientism and Western ideas of progress and realism, were widely adopted by oil painters and traditionalist ink painters alike during this period. Through consideration of the delicate negotiation between foreign and endogenous possibilities and analysis of the theory and practice of representative masters, this talk will reflect on the persistent debate over the technical direction of Chinese-style painting in the modern world.


March 17

Music And Dance

Jazz Series
Ellen Rowe, piano and Andrew Bishop, saxophone
Wednesday, March 17
Commons
Admission is $5 at the door

Experience outstanding local jazz artists in an intimate group setting at this exciting series curated by UM Professor of Music Adam Unsworth.



Museum Theme Year

Please join us for the conclusion of the Wednesday Night Museums lecture series.

The Social Museum: Online Community Building and the Future of Museums
Wednesday, March 17, 7:30 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Join Matthew Fisher, founder and president of the design company Night Kitchen Interactive and collaborator on UMMA’s DialogTable, for a discussion about the role of social media and interactive installations in realizing the missions of forward-thinking museums. Drawing on over a decade of experience in consulting with museums across the country on the use of technology to reach audiences in innovative ways, Matthew will share his thoughts on the evolution of museums in the 21st century from being visitor-centric exhibition spaces to participatory platforms for dialogue, creativity, and even transformation. Matthew will illustrate how Night Kitchen has teamed with museums such as the Smithsonian, SFMOMA, and UMMA, to inspire and engage visitors as participants in lively, collaborative experiences, both online and off.

Presented in partnership with LSA Museum Theme Year, the Museum Studies Program, and the School of Information.


March 18

Zell Visiting Writers Series

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the UM Department of English Program in Creative Writing Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell (’64).

Yiyun Li
Thursday, March 18, 5:15 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Yiyun Li's stories and essays have been published in The New Yorker, Best American Short Stories, O Henry Prize Stories, and elsewhere. She has received fellowships and awards from the Lannan Foundation and Whiting Foundation. Her story collection, A Thousand Years of Good Prayers, won the Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award, PEN/Hemingway Award, Guardian First Book Award, and California Book Award for first fiction. The Vagrants, her debut novel, was published in February, 2009. She was selected by Granta as one of the 21 Best Young American Novelists under 35.



Ann Arbor Art Center Workshops

Advance registration is required. Please register online at annarborartcenter.org

Nights at the Museum
Thursdays, March 11–April 15, 6:30–9 pm
$125 members and UM students/$139 non-members; $20 lab free

Each week we'll look at a different work or group of works in either the collections galleries or special exhibitions. You’ll create your own masterpiece in response and learn a variety of art-making techniques. Along the way expect gallery games, scavenger hunts, excitement and fun—come with an open mind and a sense of adventure! All levels welcome.



UM Student Programs

Third Thursdays
Thursday, March 18, 9 pm
Commons

UMMA is a new site for UM students to show what they’ve got. This exciting performance series falls on the third Thursday evening of each month and features different student performers who work in a variety of media. The series is curated and produced by the UMMA Student Programming and Advisory Board.


March 19

UM Student Programs

Mark Webster Reading Series
March 19, 7 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

One poet and one fiction writer from the MFA program, each introduced by a peer, will read a selection of their work. The Mark Webster reading series presents emerging writers in an intimate and inviting setting. We encourage you to bring your friends for an invigorating, alternative Friday night.



UMMA Exhibitions Programming

Film
Herb and Dorothy
Friday, March 19, 9:30 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Herb and Dorothy tells the extraordinary story of Herbert Vogel, a postal clerk, and Dorothy Vogel, a librarian, who managed to build one of the most important contemporary art collections in history with very modest means. They collected artworks guided by two rules: the piece had to be affordable, and it had to be small enough to fit in their one-bedroom Manhattan apartment. Most of those they supported and befriended in this process went on to become world-renowned artists, including Sol LeWitt, Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Richard Tuttle, and Chuck Close. Directed by Megumi Sasaki.


March 20

Guided Tours

An Economy of Means: The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection
Saturday, March 20, 2 pm



Music And Dance

Angika: Sculpture and the Dancing Body
Saturday, March 20, 7:30pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Explore the connections between centuries old traditions of performing and visual arts in India. Performed in the Odissi style by acclaimed dancer and choreographer Sreyashi Dey and her company Srishti, this performance will be narrated by actor-director Martin Walsh and is scripted by poet Zilka Joseph. Odissi classical dance is derived directly from temple sculptures, similar to the ones in UMMA’s collection, creating an intimate connection between the live dancing body and the visual representation of the body in art forms such as sculpture and paintings. A multimedia presentation will add another dimension to the performance.

This program is presented by Arts on Earth.


March 21

Guided Tours

The New UMMA
Sunday, March 21, 1 pm



UMMA Exhibitions Programming

Bright Sheng and Friends: East/West
Sunday, March 21, 4 pm
Apse

UM School of Music, Theatre, and Dance faculty composer and MacArthur fellow Bright Sheng presents his own works—A Night at the Chinese Opera, Three Chinese Love Songs, Seven Tunes Heard in China, The Stream Flows, and the Third String Quartet—juxtaposed with studies in orientalism by Maurice Ravel and Bela Bartok. Sheng is joined by fellow SMTD faculty Stephen Shipps and Logan Skelton, the Phoenix Ensemble, DMA cellist Paul Dwyer, and guest artist Jennifer Goltz.

Tradition Transformed is made possible in part the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, the UM Center for Chinese Studies, and the Blakemore Foundation. Additional support was provided by Mary Palmer and the George Dewey and Mary J. Krumrine Endowment.



UMMA Exhibitions Programming

Film
Herb and Dorothy
Sunday, March 21, 3 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Herb and Dorothy tells the extraordinary story of Herbert Vogel, a postal clerk, and Dorothy Vogel, a librarian, who managed to build one of the most important contemporary art collections in history with very modest means. They collected artworks guided by two rules: the piece had to be affordable, and it had to be small enough to fit in their one-bedroom Manhattan apartment. Most of those they supported and befriended in this process went on to become world-renowned artists, including Sol LeWitt, Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Richard Tuttle, and Chuck Close. Directed by Megumi Sasaki.


March 23

Lecture

Curatorial Decision Making in Times of Change
Tuesday, March 23, 7 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Balancing meaning-making for audiences, the ephemeral nature of exhibitions, and the often purpose-built longevity of objects themselves, curators of contemporary art are under constant dual pressure to appeal to audiences and at the same time strive for historical significance. In addition, new technologies of mediated viewership have changed audience expectations when faced with works of art in a gallery or museum environment. Betti-Sue Hertz, Director of Visual Arts at the Yerba Buena Center for Art in San Francisco, will use exhibitions that she has organized in recent years as case studies for navigating an investigation of the conditions of current curatorial practice.

Cosponsored by Roman J. Witt Visiting Artist-Designer Program, School of Art and Design, and UM Museum Studies Program



March 24

Ann Arbor Film Festival

The Ann Arbor Film Festival is the longest-running independent and experimental film festival in North America. Founded in 1963 by UM professor George Manupelli, the AAFF started as a vital forum for filmmakers outside of the commercial film industry to share their art with audiences. Today the festival continues its founding spirit as a premier showcase for bold, visionary, experimental, and high-caliber films. The 48th Ann Arbor Film Festival takes place March 23–28, and UMMA is delighted to cosponsor the following AAFF programs, which will be held in the Helmut Stern Auditorium. All events are free.

Time Machine: Bill Brown and Sabine Gruffat
Wednesday, March 24, 5 pm

The Time Machine is your guide through the fourth dimension. Watch and learn about real-time rendering, quartz, and max patches as Sabine Gruffat steers you through the sensory drone of the digital and analog hyperspace. Bill Brown takes you on a guided tour of memory’s roadside attractions by way of scratchy records and the hazy glow of 35mm slides, narrating the interspatial monuments of our extemporary voyage.

Co-curated by the Witt Visiting Artists program at UM School of Art and Design.


March 25

Zell Visiting Writers Series

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the UM Department of English Program in Creative Writing Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell (’64).

Lorna Goodison and V. V. Ganeshananthan
Thursday, March 25, 5:15 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Lorna Goodison is one of the Caribbean's most distinguished contemporary poets. Her work appears in the Norton Anthology of World Masterpieces and her many honors include the Commonwealth Poetry Prize, Americas Region and the Musgrave Gold Medal. She is the author of numerous books of poetry, including Controlling the Silver, Goldengrove: New and Selected Poems, Travelling Mercies (2001) and Turn Thanks: Poems (1999), as well as two collections of short stories and an acclaimed memoir, From Harvey River: A Memoir of My Mother and Her People.

V.V. Ganeshananthan, a fiction writer and journalist, is the author of Love Marriage (Random House, 2008). Set in Sri Lanka and its diaspora, the novel was named one of Washington Post Book World's Best Books of 2008, selected for the Barnes and Noble Discover Great New Writers program, and long-listed for the Orange Prize. Her short fiction has appeared in Granta, on Esquire.com, and in Himal Southasian magazine. Her journalism and essays have appeared in The Atlantic Monthly, Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post, among others.



Ann Arbor Art Center Workshops

Advance registration is required. Please register online at annarborartcenter.org

Nights at the Museum
Thursdays, March 11–April 15, 6:30–9 pm
$125 members and UM students/$139 non-members; $20 lab free

Each week we'll look at a different work or group of works in either the collections galleries or special exhibitions. You’ll create your own masterpiece in response and learn a variety of art-making techniques. Along the way expect gallery games, scavenger hunts, excitement and fun—come with an open mind and a sense of adventure! All levels welcome.



Poetry Slam, Grand Slam

Thursday, March 25, 8:30 pm
Apse

Check out a cadre of talented poets from the UM National Slam Team with a feature performance from Def Poet Oveous Maximus. UM boasts a nationally recognized team so you can expect a high-energy evening of outrageous word slinging.


March 26

Ann Arbor Film Festival

The Ann Arbor Film Festival is the longest-running independent and experimental film festival in North America. Founded in 1963 by UM professor George Manupelli, the AAFF started as a vital forum for filmmakers outside of the commercial film industry to share their art with audiences. Today the festival continues its founding spirit as a premier showcase for bold, visionary, experimental, and high-caliber films. The 48th Ann Arbor Film Festival takes place March 23–28, and UMMA is delighted to cosponsor the following AAFF programs, which will be held in the Helmut Stern Auditorium. All events are free.

Tomorrow’s Obsolescence
Friday, March 26, 3:30 pm

A panel discussion examining theatrical and online viewing, DVDs, downloads, and artists’ cinema in the next decade. Featuring Emily Doe of Wholphin (San Francisco), Brigid Reagan of Video Data Bank (Chicago), and Benjamin Cook of LUX Artist’s Moving Image (London, England) and moderated by Jonathan Marlow of the San Francisco Cinematheque.

Music Video Showcase - Films in Competition
Friday, March 26, 5:30 pm

An inspired program of independent music videos. Presented in conjunction with Ghostly International.



UM Student Programs

Mark Webster Reading Series
March 26, 7 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

One poet and one fiction writer from the MFA program, each introduced by a peer, will read a selection of their work. The Mark Webster reading series presents emerging writers in an intimate and inviting setting. We encourage you to bring your friends for an invigorating, alternative Friday night.



The Ark at UMMA Student Songwriter Series

Friday, March 26, 8–10pm
Commons

The Ark invites student songwriters at the University of Michigan to submit their original music demo in order to compete for a live performance showcase at UMMA and a chance to perform at The Ark. After a successful launch in fall 2009, the series continues with two performance showcases (February and March 12) featuring the best of the student songwriters selected by the Ark staff from the contest submissions, and a final performance and announcement of the winner of the series (March 26), who will be invited to perform at The Ark.



UMMA Exhibitions Programming

Film
Herb and Dorothy
Friday, March 26, 9:30 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Herb & Dorothy tells the extraordinary story of Herbert Vogel, a postal clerk, and Dorothy Vogel, a librarian, who managed to build one of the most important contemporary art collections in history with very modest means. They collected artworks guided by two rules: the piece had to be affordable, and it had to be small enough to fit in their one-bedroom Manhattan apartment. Most of those they supported and befriended in this process went on to become world-renowned artists, including Sol LeWitt, Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Richard Tuttle, and Chuck Close. Directed by Megumi Sasaki.


March 27

Ann Arbor Art Center Workshops

Advance registration is required. Please register online at annarborartcenter.org

Drawing I and II: Inspired by the Collections
Saturdays, March 20–April 24 (6 weeks, no class 4/10), 1:30–4 pm
$125 members and UM students/$139 non-members; $10 model fee

This class focuses upon drawing from observation. Become well acquainted with Modern abstract sculpture (Giacometti, Moore, Calder), bronze dancers by Rodin, African works (nailed ritual objects, beaded hats, fertility figures), and Thai Buddha and Indian Shiva figures, while developing a sense of proportion, perspective, line quality, value, composition, and personal style. For the first class, please bring the following: HB, 2B, and 2H graphite pencils; an eraser; and an 11 x 14 inch sketchbook. All levels welcome.



Music and Dance

Positive Space
Saturday, March 27, 2–5pm
Various galleries

A commissioning project featuring works conceived as a new form of percussion concerto for standard chamber ensemble, composed by UM composition students Asaf Peres, David Biedenbender, Roger Zare, William Stanton, Paul Dooley, Recep Gul. Non-traditional performance spaces throughout the Museum encourage visitors to build their own concert program; creators will be on hand to speak about the works. Conceived and led by UM percussion majors Peter Dodds and Samuel Livingston, the music installation features a variety of instrumentalists from SMTD.


March 28

Ann Arbor Film Festival

The Ann Arbor Film Festival is the longest-running independent and experimental film festival in North America. Founded in 1963 by UM professor George Manupelli, the AAFF started as a vital forum for filmmakers outside of the commercial film industry to share their art with audiences. Today the festival continues its founding spirit as a premier showcase for bold, visionary, experimental, and high-caliber films. The 48th Ann Arbor Film Festival takes place March 23–28, and UMMA is delighted to cosponsor the following AAFF programs, which will be held in the Helmut Stern Auditorium. All events are free.

"What the Hell Was That?"
Sunday, March 28, 12 pm

Experimental film is often misunderstood as an art form within the realm of cinema. Several challenging, short experimental films from the 48th Ann Arbor Film Festival will be presented and screened by participating panelists, followed by discussion with the audience.

Copresented by UM Screen Arts and Cultures.



Guided Tours

The New UMMA
Sunday, March 28, 1 pm

Tradition Transformed: Chang Ku-nien, Master Painter of the 20th Century
Sunday March 28, 2 pm



UMMA Exhibitions Programming

Film
Herb and Dorothy
Sunday, March 28, 3 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Herb and Dorothy tells the extraordinary story of Herbert Vogel, a postal clerk, and Dorothy Vogel, a librarian, who managed to build one of the most important contemporary art collections in history with very modest means. They collected artworks guided by two rules: the piece had to be affordable, and it had to be small enough to fit in their one-bedroom Manhattan apartment. Most of those they supported and befriended in this process went on to become world-renowned artists, including Sol LeWitt, Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Richard Tuttle, and Chuck Close. Directed by Megumi Sasaki.


March 30

Tuesday Night Lecture Series: Translating Knowledge; Global Perspectives on Museums and Community

Translating Knowledge considers strategies for engaging the peoples whose lives and histories are presented in the museum in the complicated processes of interpreting culture. This year-long lecture series organized by the UM Museum Studies Program brings 10 scholars to the University of Michigan from around the world and the US. These scholars’ work offers new paradigms for confronting the social and political challenges of representation in the museum. Each participant will present a lecture that examines the theory and a workshop that explores the practice of their community-engaged scholarship.

All Tuesday night lectures are in the UMMA Helmut Stern Auditorium at 7 pm and all Wednesday afternoon workshops are in the UMMA Multipurpose Room at 4 pm.

Ivan Karp
Emory University
Lecture: Tuesday, March 30, 7 pm, Helmut Stern Auditorium
Workshop: Wednesday, March 31, 4 pm, Multipurpose Room


March 31

Tuesday Night Lecture Series (workshop)

Ivan Karp
Emory University
Lecture: Tuesday, March 30, 7 pm, Helmut Stern Auditorium
Workshop: Wednesday, March 31, 4 pm, Multipurpose Room


March 31

Inaugural Charles Lang Freer Lecture in the Visual Arts

Chinese Calligraphy: Seeing an Ancient Art through Modern Eyes
A lecture by H. Christopher Luce
Wednesday, March 31, 4:30 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

This event is presented by the UM Department of the History of Art and cosponsored by the Confucius Institute and the University of Michigan Museum of Art.