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Programs and Tours

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October 1

Ann Arbor Art Center Workshops at UMMA

Create your own masterpieces at UMMA. This fall the Ann Arbor Art Center will offer art-making workshops on Thursday evenings and Saturday afternoons. With a wide variety of subject matters, there is a class for everyone.

Nights at the Museum
Instructor: Christy Kelly-Bentgen
Thursdays, October 1–8, 6:30–9 pm
$76 members/$85 non-members, $20 lab fee.

Each week this class will focus on a different work or group of works from the galleries. Students will learn a variety of techniques and create their own masterpieces. Along the way expect gallery games, scavenger hunts, excitement, and fun! Come with an open mind and a sense of adventure! (All levels welcome.)



Film & Video Student Association’s First Thursday: Screen Arts & Cultures

Student Honors Projects
Thursday, October 1, 7 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

The Screen Arts and Cultures (SAC) Department and the Film Video Student Association present a selection of SAC student honors projects. Honors in SAC is a highly competitive program in which students work closely with faculty to create original, advanced-level work, either a production project or a written thesis. This curated program showcases film, television, and digital honors projects from the past decade.




October 2

Films offered in conjunction with Warhol Snapshots, 1973–1986

UMMA Exhibitions Programming
Friday, October 2, 9 pm

The documentary films in this series explore the multiple realities of the 60s and 70s, both in their time and in retrospect. The series is divided into four programs: Signs of the Times examines the political and social climate that gave rise to the Pop sensibility; All About Andy takes a closer look at the artist himself; Intimate Portraits turns the lens on two tragic victims of Warhol’s star system; The Scene paints a vivid portrait of the artistic circles of the times.

All films are screened in the Helmut Stern Auditorium, and all are free charge.



October 3

Intimate Portraits
Saturday, October 3

8 pm Nico Icon (Susanne Ofteringer, 1994, 67 min)
A look into the many lives of Christa Päffgen, otherwise known as Nico, from cutie German madchen to the first of the supermodels, to glamorous diva of the Velvet Underground, to cult item, junkie, and hag.

9:15 pm A Walk Into the Sea: Danny Williams and the Warhol Factory (Esther Robinson, 2007, 92 min)
Esther Robinson's portrait of her uncle Danny Williams, Warhol's onetime lover, collaborator, and a filmmaker in his own right, offers an exploration of the Factory era, an homage to Williams's talent, a journey of family discovery, and a compelling inquiry into Williams's mysterious disappearance at age 27.



Guided Tour

The New UMMA
Saturday, October 3, 1 pm



Ann Arbor Art Center Workshops at UMMA

Create your own masterpieces at UMMA. This fall the Ann Arbor Art Center will offer art-making workshops on Thursday evenings and Saturday afternoons. With a wide variety of subject matters, there is a class for everyone.

Drawing from the Collections
Saturdays, October 3–10, 1:30–4 pm
$76 members/$85 non-members.

Working in the studio and in the galleries students will learn the basic principles of drawing: lines, planes, values, and perspective. (All levels welcome.)




October 4

Guided Tours

The New UMMA
Sunday, October 4, 1 pm

(Un)Natural History: The Museum Unveiled
Sunday, October 4, 2 pm



Films offered in conjunction with Warhol Snapshots, 1973–1986

UMMA Exhibitions Programming
Sunday, October 4, 5 pm

All films are screened in the Helmut Stern Auditorium, and all are free charge.

Encore presentation
Sunday, October 4, 5 pm
Dont Look Back (DA Pennebaker, 1967)




October 5

“Masterpieces Revealed” Series: Unlocking the secrets of Beethoven’s Cello

Sonata No. 2 in g minor
Monday, October 5, 7-8:30 pm
UMMA Apse

In the “Masterpieces Revealed” series, local artists provide a step-by-step exploration of some of the artistic works presented on the UMS season through live performance and discussion, deconstructing the nuances of performance and explaining what turns a piece into a “masterpiece.”  Events take place on weekday evenings at UMMA, allowing for informal exchange between artist and audience.

To kick off our Masterpieces Revealed series, which uses live performance and discussion as a method of audience engagement, UM Professor of Cello Anthony Elliott and U-M Associate Professor of Musicology Steven Whiting will illuminate Beethoven’s masterful Cello Sonata No. 2.  By listening to this music and its underlying structure in new and interesting ways, any and every listener will come away with an enhanced understanding of what exactly makes this work great.  

A collaboration with UMMA and the U-M School of Music, Theatre, and Dance.




October 7

Guided Tour

The New UMMA
Wednesday, October 7, 12 pm



The Wednesday Night Museums Lecture Series

Wednesday, October 7, 7:30 pm

Join us on Wednesday evenings for lectures by Museum professionals from across the country. They will speak on a range of unique topics and issues central to today’s museums. All lectures are free and open to the public and will take place in UMMA’s Helmut Stern Auditorium unless otherwise indicated.

(Un)Natural History and the Power of Display
Wednesday, October 7, 7:30 pm

Artist Scott Hocking works with the devastated urban landscape of Detroit to create powerful installations that speak to the ways in which ruined cities become museums of natural history. Richard Barnes concentrates on the museum practice of encasing animals and human beings in vitrines—another sort of a crypt or ruin. Michael Stafford, Director of Cranbrook Institute of Science, creates impactful, socially relevant natural history experiences for museum visitors. Join them in a wide-ranging conversation moderated by Daniel Herwitz, Director of the University of Michigan Institute for the Humanities, who will also lend his own perspectives. This program is cosponsored by Cranbrook Art Museum and Cranbrook Institute of Science, UM Exhibit Museum, UM Institute for Humanities, UM School of Art and Design Penny Stamps Lecture Series, and UMMA. What’s Special about the University Art Museum? Perspectives on Museums in the Academy




October 8

Zell Visiting Writers Lecture Series

Thursday, October 8

UMMA is delighted to become the home of the Department of English Program in Creative Writing Zell Visiting Writers Lecture Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is endowed by a gift from UM alumna Helen Zell (’64). All readings are held in the Helmut Stern Auditorium at 5 pm on Thursdays unless noted and are free of charge. For more information, please see www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/mfaeve.asp.

These events are cosponsored by the Department of English and the Office of the Provost of the University of Michigan.



Crystal Williams Poetry Reading

Thursday, October 8

Crystal Williams’ third collection of poems, Troubled Tongues, was chosen by Marilyn Nelson for the 2009 Long Madgett Poetry Award. Her poetry appears in the American Poetry Review as well as other reviews and anthologies. Raised in Detroit, Michigan, and Madrid, Spain, she is currently working on two plays and a collection of essays.



Screen Arts and Cultures Film Series

Thursday, October 8, 7 pm
Together with UM’s Screen Arts and Cultures program (SAC), UMMA will offer a range of films in the new Helmut Stern Auditorium on the Museum's lower level.

How Ohio Pulled It Off (Charla Barker, Matthew Kraus, Mariana Quiroga, 2008) Thursday, October 8, 7 pm

On election night 2004, across the United States and the world, citizens were glued to their televisions, waiting to discover who would win the greatest power position on the planet. The presidential decision came down to one state among fifty: Ohio. What really happened in Ohio, on that fateful day in November? This provocative new documentary takes to the streets and polling places, uncovering an alarming pattern of disenfranchisement among Ohio’s urban minorities.




October 10

Guided Tour

The New UMMA
Saturday, October 10, 1 pm



Public Goods Open House: “Behind the Scenes”

Saturday, October 10, 10 am–2 pm

Join curators and other UMMA staff in our galleries to talk about how their work behind the scenes results in exhibitions and collections displays.



American Romanian Festival

Saturday, October 10

UMMA is pleased to be cosponsoring a film series and concert for the Third Annual American Romanian Festival, which will include many other educational, cultural, and artistic events in both the United States and Romania, including a lecture at UM by the renowned author and NPR contributor Andrei Codrescu. For more details about the events and the festival, please visit www.americanromanianfestival.org.

All films are screened in the Helmut Stern Auditorium and are free of charge.

Cosponsored by the American Romanian Festival, the UM Center for Russian and East European Studies, and UMMA.

Romanian Film Series Part I
Saturday, October 10

7 pm Bela Lugosi: The Fallen Vampire by Florin Iepan (52 min, narrated in English)

8:20 pm The One, The Only, The Real Tarzan by Florin Iepan (50 min, narrated in English)

9:30 pm The Year of the Tiger by Dan Secosan (2002) (28 min, English subtitles)




October 11

Guided Tour

The New UMMA
Sunday, October 11, 1 pm

The Lens of Impressionism: Photography and Painting Along the Normandy Coast, 1850–1874
Sunday, October 11, 2 pm




October 13

Tuesday Night Lecture Series

October 13, 7 pm
Translating Knowledge: Global Perspectives on Museum and Community

“Translating Knowledge” considers strategies for engaging the peoples whose lives and histories are presented in the museum in the complicated processes of interpreting culture. This year-long lecture series organized by the UM Museum Studies Program brings 10 scholars to the University of Michigan from South Africa, India, Australia, New Zealand, Great Britain, the Philippines, and the US. These scholars’ work offers new paradigms for confronting the social and political challenges of representation in the museum. Each participant will present a lecture that examines the theory and a workshop that explores the practice of their community- engaged scholarship.

All Tuesday night lectures are in the UMMA Helmut Stern Auditorium and all Wednesday afternoon workshops are in the UMMA Multipurpose Room.

Gwyn Isaac
Arizona State University

Lecture: October 13, 7 pm
Workshop: October 14, 4 pm




October 14

Guided Tour

The Lens of Impressionism: Photography and Painting Along the Normandy Coast, 1850–1874
Wednesday, October 14, 12 pm




October 15

Zell Visiting Writers Lecture Series

David Wevill Poetry Reading
Thursday, October 15

David Wevill was born a Canadian in Japan in 1935, and was educated in both Canada and England. Awarded prizes and included in all the major anthologies, he now lives and teaches in Austin, Texas. He has recently published Solo With Grazing Deer (2001) and has also published translations of Fernando Pessoa and Ferenc Juhász.

These events are cosponsored by the Department of English and the Office of the Provost of the University of Michigan.



Ann Arbor Art Center Workshops at UMMA

Painting Studio
Thursdays, October 15–November 5, (October 15, 22, 29, November 5), 6:30–9 pm
$76 members/$85 non-members.

Students will learn basic painting skills, including the fundamentals of color, color mixing, composition, and brush handling. Bring personal photos, sketches, and ideas to realize in a finished painting or come and get inspired by UMMA’s outstanding collection. (All levels welcome.)



Screen Arts and Cultures Film Series

Thursday, October 15, 7 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

What the Hell Was That?” A screening of and discussion about experimental film.
Thursday, October 15, 7 pm

Experimental film is an often-misunderstood art form within the world of movies. Join us for an educational screening and discussion in partnership with the Ann Arbor Film Festival and Executive Director Donald Harrison. Four challenging, short experimental films from the Ann Arbor Film Festival's archives will be presented and screened by participating panelists, followed by discussion with the audience.



UM Student Programs
Student Performance Series
Third Thursday Evenings

Thursday, October 15, 9 pm
UMMA Commons

UMMA is a new site for UM students to show what they’ve got. This exciting performance series falls on the third Thursday evening of each month and features different student performers who work in a variety of media. The series is curated and produced by the UMMA Student Programming and Advisory Board. To learn more about the performance series and the Board please visit: http://www.umma.umich.edu/for-students/

These programs are made possible in part by the Katherine Tuck Enrichment Fund.




October 16

The Ark at UMMA
UM Student Showcase

Friday, October 16, 7-9 pm
UMMA Commons

This new student-songwriter series invites UM students to submit their original music demo in order to compete for a live performance showcase at the Museum and a chance to perform at The Ark. This event will feature the best of the student-songwriters selected by Ark staff from the contest submissions. Submissions should be sent by Wednesday, September 30 to The Ark, Attn Emily Ross, 316 S. Main Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104 or via email to emily@theark.org.




October 17

Guided Tours

The New UMMA
Saturday, October 17, 1 pm

The Lens of Impressionism: Photography and Painting Along the Normandy Coast, 1850–1874
Saturday, October 17, 2 pm



Free Drop-In Family Workshop
Seascapes: Exploring the Horizon

Instructor: Harold E. Philbrook III
Saturday, October 17, 1:30–4:30 pm

Come and create your very own seascape painting inspired by paintings and photography from the exhibit The Lens of Impressionism: Photography and Painting Along the Normandy Coast, 1850–1874. You’ll explore a variety of painting techniques to create the sea and sky, and discover how the horizon line can be used to give your image the illusion of depth.

Presented with support from the University of Michigan Credit Union.




October 18

Guided Tours

The New UMMA
Sunday, October 18, 1 pm

The Lens of Impressionism: Photography and Painting Along the Normandy Coast, 1850–1874
Sunday, October 18, 2 pm



Painting and Photography in Normandy: The Aesthetic of the Instant Carole McNamara, UMMA Senior Curator of Western Art

Sunday, October 18, 3 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Carole McNamara, will introduce the exhibition The Lens of Impressionism: Photography and Painting Along the Normandy Coast, 1850–1874 and explore the themes addressed in the exhibition. Taking a fresh look at the conceptual and aesthetic ideas exchanged between photographers and painters working along the Normandy coast during this unique period, McNamara will argue that these exchanges shaped not only artistic themes and conventions but also the ideas of the modern in artistic practice.

Lecture programs for the exhibition The Lens of Impressionism are presented with the support of the Florence Gould Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the University of Michigan’s Office of the Provost.




October 21

Guided Tour

The Lens of Impressionism: Photography and Painting Along the Normandy Coast, 1850–1874
Wednesday, October 21, 12 pm



Musical Contemporaries of the Impressionists

Wednesday, October 21, 8 pm
Apse

The desire for a creative milieu independent of established French institutions was shared by visual artists and composers alike in the second half of the 19th century. This program features vocal and instrumental solo and chamber works by independent composers such as Emmanuel Chabrier, Camille Saint-Saens, Georges Bizet, Henri Duparc, and Cesar Franck, performed by SMTD students. Those planning to attend the concert on the 21st may enjoy the program “Everything is Moving”, which explores the body and movement as a dimension of performance in conjunction with Arts on Earth’s “Arts and Bodies.” See www.artsonearth.org




October 22

Zell Visiting Writers Lecture Series

Scott Lasser and Travis Holland Fiction Reading
Thursday, October 22, 5 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Scott Lasser is the author of three novels: Battle Creek, All I Could Get, and The Year That Follows. His non-fiction has appeared in magazines ranging from Dealmaker to The New Yorker. He holds several degrees, including an MBA, and lives with his family in Aspen, Colorado.

Travis Holland is the author of The Archivist’s Story, which was listed among the best books of the year by the Financial Times. Winner of several awards and published in a variety of journals, he is a graduate of the University of Michigan’s MFA program.

These events are cosponsored by the Department of English and the Office of the Provost of the University of Michigan.



Screen Arts and Cultures Film Series

Thursday, October 22, 7 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Ageless Ohio
Thursday, October 22, 7 pm

Join us for a student reading of Ageless Ohio, a screenplay written by Matthew Reichl (AB, UM and MFA, UCLA’s School of Theater, Film and Television, and Hopwood Award recipient). The story concerns a father and son crime team on the run from other criminals who stumble upon a fantasy town permanently stuck in the 1950s, where they must decide whether to stay or leave before "Paradise" vanishes forever.




October 24

Guided Tours

The New UMMA
Saturday, October 24, 1 pm

The Lens of Impressionism: Photography and Painting Along the Normandy Coast, 1850–1874
Saturday, October 24, 2 pm



Ann Arbor Art Center Workshops at UMMA

Two-Session Workshop: Assemblage Boxes
Saturdays, October 24 AND 31 (2 sessions), 1:30–4 pm
$45 members/$48 non-members, $20 lab fee

Using works by Joseph Cornell, Louise Nevelson, and Betye Saar as inspiration, students will create their own assemblage in this upbeat two-session workshop. The class will focus on principles of design and sound construction with found objects as well as a variety of collage techniques. Register at annarborartcenter.org.



American Romanian Festival

All films are screened in the Helmut Stern Auditorium and are free of charge.

Cosponsored by the American Romanian Festival, the UM Center for Russian and East European Studies, and UMMA.

Romanian Film Series Part II
Saturday, October 24

7 pm Bran Castle, Vlad Tepes vs. Dracula, Rasnov Stronghold by Nicolae Margineanu (2005)
(60 min, narrated in English)

8:20 pm Somewhere in the East by Nicolae Margineanu (1991)
(106 min, English subtitles)




October 25

Guided Tours

The New UMMA
Sunday, October 25, 1 pm

The Lens of Impressionism: Photography and Painting Along the Normandy Coast, 1850–1874
Sunday, October 25, 2 pm



American Romanian Festival

Octet Chamber Music Concert
Sunday, October 25, 7:30 pm
$10 at the door

Experience the brilliant masterpiece of George Enescu. The Octet op. 7 mirrors the composer’s unique charm, humor, and passion. This virtuoso ensemble made up of musicians from Ohio and Michigan will also perform the Octet for a Double String Quartet by Thomas L. Read. The program will open with the Octet in Two Movements by Dmitri Shostakovich.

Cosponsored by the American Romanian Festival, the UM Center for Russian and East European Studies, and UMMA.




October 28

Guided Tour

The Lens of Impressionism: Photography and Painting Along the Normandy Coast, 1850–1874
Wednesday, October 28, 12 pm



Picturing a Province: Representations of Normandy from Romantic to Modern
Professor Stephen Bann, University of Bristol (UK)

Wednesday, October 28, 5 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

The lecture by Dr. Stephen Bann, Professor Emeritus of the History of Art, University of Bristol, UK and a Fellow of the British Academy, and one of the leading art historians of his generation, will examine a wide variety of print images of Normandy, ranging from expensive engravings and lithographs to postcards and magazines. It will be argued that there is a tension between what could be termed the “Vertical Sublime” and the “Horizontal Sublime.” The preeminence of records of Gothic architecture in the Romantic period is followed by an increasing emphasis on landscape as a carrier of regional identity.

This program has been supported in part by the University of Michigan Department of the History of Art.



The Wednesday Night Museums Lecture Series

A Conversation with Lawrence Rinder, Thomas W. Lentz, and James Steward, moderated by Ray Silverman
Wednesday, October 28, 7:30 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Three of America’s leading university art museum directors—Thomas W. Lentz, Director of the Harvard University Art Museums, Lawrence Rinder, Director of the UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, and James Steward, Director of the Princeton University Art Museum—discuss the place of university art museums in the American educational enterprise. This program is part of the LSA Theme Year Meaningful Objects: Museums in the Academy, and also has roots in UMMA’s ongoing series of public discussions entitled Reimagining the Museum. Professor Ray Silverman, Director of the University of Michigan’s Museum Studies Program and interim Co-Director of UMMA, will moderate.




October 29

The 2nd Annual Hubert Cohen Film Criticism and Film Scholarship Series Lecture

Thursday, October 29, 7 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Dennis Harvey, University of Michigan alum and film critic for Variety will return to campus to deliver the 2nd Annual Hubert Cohen Film Criticism and Film Scholarship Series lecture. Harvey will discuss the current state of film criticism in this country as well as pay tribute to his former instructor, Hugh Cohen, the much beloved professor of film studies at UM in the Department of Screen Arts and Cultures and in the Residential College.




October 30

Born Like a Phoenix from the Ashes? The ‘Renewal’ of French Music 1870–1918
Dr. Jane Fulcher

Friday, October 30, 3 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

This lecture by eminent UM Musicology Professor Jane Fulcher traces the emergence of an independent French musical culture in the 1860s with the foundation of the Théatre Lyrique and the works of composers such as Gounod, Bizet, Saint-Saens, and Chabrier, culminating in a discussion of Debussy’s evolution from within the Paris Conservatoire into the independent artistic culture of the Symbolists and the Société Nationale de Musique Français. As it will demonstrate, the seeds of an independent new musical culture were already planted in the 1860s, after the foundation of the musical equivalent of the Salon des Réfusées.

Lecture programs for the exhibition The Lens of Impressionism are presented with the support of the Florence Gould Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the University of Michigan’s Office of the Provost.




October 31

Guided Tours

The New UMMA
Saturday, October 31, 1 pm

The Lens of Impressionism: Photography and Painting Along the Normandy Coast, 1850–1874
Saturday, October 31, 2 pm