For Students

Past Exhibitions: 2005

Walker Evans and James Agee: Let Us Now Praise Famous Men

October 22, 2005–December 18, 2005

This exhibition recreates one of the seminal literary-artistic collaborations of the 20th century through the magisterial photographs of Walker Evans, documenting the plight of Alabama sharecroppers during the Great Depression, alongside the prose of James Agee. Initiated as an assignment from Fortune magazine as an article about poverty in the South, the project was never published by Fortune, but was instead realized in book form in 1941. Contemporary critics were struck by the power of Evans’s portraits, which convey the simple dignity of the families portrayed. The Museum is pleased to present this rare opportunity to rediscover an extraordinary American achievement.

Walker Evans and James Agee: Let Us Now Praise Famous Men, curated by Ulrich Keller, is from the collections of the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, and is was organized by the Ransom Center and Curatorial Assistance Traveling Exhibition (CATE), Los Angeles. The exhibition is circulated by CATE.


This exhibition is made possible by Ford Motor Company Fund.

Additional support for the Ann Arbor showing has been provided by the Katherine Tuck Enrichment Fund and the Doris Sloan Memorial Fund.


Walker Evans
Allie Mae Burroughs
1936
Gelatin silver print
Courtesy of the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin


Walker Evans
Washing and Dining Area of Burroughs's Home
1936
Gelatin silver print
Courtesy of the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin


Walker Evans
William and Ida Ruth Tengle
1936
Gelatin silver print
Courtesy of the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin


Walker Evans
Main Street
1936
Gelatin silver print
Courtesy of the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin


Walker Evans
Floyd Burroughs
1936
Gelatin silver print
Courtesy of the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin


Walker Evans
Bud Fields Standing in Cotton Field
1936
Gelatin silver print
Courtesy of the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin